Category Archives: Tanks and Equipment

Our path to reopening

We are excited to start floating again (we need it at least as much as you do), and we want to make sure we are doing everything we possibly can to keep you and our staff safe. We still believe that floating is on the lesser end of the risk spectrum, but we’re taking all available improvement advice from experts and our professional association, the Floatation Tank Association.

Sanitation has always been vitally important to us, but in this pandemic we are going to enhance our normal procedures. Part of that enhancement is the addition of UV-C sanitation lights to the rooms, and portable UV-C sanitation for the insides of the tanks. UV-C has been a standard of clean room technology for years, and I hope this addition will increase your peace of mind. Shipping is still kind of dicey these days, so I don’t have a firm date on their arrival. We’ll also have some changes to the way we do things, but I’ll go into that in a future post.

We will open when we have everything in place to assure maximum safety for you and our staff. Here’s the general checklist we’re using:

  1. Sanitation supplies (toilet paper, disinfectant, gloves, etc) are easy to source.
  2. New equipment has arrived, including safety equipment for staff.
  3. UV sanitation lights have arrived and are in working order.
  4. Repairs are finished.
  5. Staff-only soft opening to practice new procedures.
  6. Soft opening for members.
  7. Opening to the general public.

We’re looking pretty good on #1. Toilet paper and gloves can still be elusive, but disinfectant, hand sanitizer, and disposable masks are generally available again. I’m confident we have adequate supply on hand. We’re also in good shape on #2: I have a big pile of new Stuff, with more on the way. The rest are in progress, and I’ll keep you posted.

Thank you for your patience as we adapt to this new normal!

Stay salty,

Sara

We’ll update this as we go.

Talking about floating with your doctor

Generally floating is very safe, although if you have concerns it’s always wise to run something new past your health care providers. I recently developed a list of general facts and medical-specific issues with an MD friend, with the intent of giving people the relevant info they need to discuss floating with their doctors. Please feel free to share!

General Facts about Floating and FLOAT Boston:

  • A float tank is a small shallow pool or large bathtub about a foot deep. Users generally float on their backs (pregnant women sometimes float prone with their elbows resting on the bottom of the tank).
  • The float solution is kept at skin temperature (93–95 degrees) for comfortable floats of 90 minutes and more. The environment is warm, humid, quiet, and dark.
  • The float solution is sanitized filtered water and very large amounts of Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate). There are about 900 pounds of Epsom salt in each of our tanks, which makes floating easy.
  • Broken skin is uncomfortable in the very salty water. If you’re unsure about your skin integrity, apply some alcohol-based hand sanitizer to the area. If it burns or stings it’ll be uncomfortable in the tank. Minor scrapes will stop stinging in a few minutes, and we do provide A+D ointment to cover small areas.
  • Between each user the float solution is run through a large physical filter and UV sanitizer. We also maintain a constant dose of hydrogen peroxide.
  • The environment can be slippery. There are safety grab bars in the shower and around the float doors. We also have a safety step and some additional props if you’re worried about your balance.
  • Getting into the tanks requires getting over a threshold of about 20″. Rooms 2 & 3 allow you to sit on the edge of the tank while lifting your feet in.
  • Rooms 1 & 4 have tanks with an angled door, which upon exit will require you to kneel and raise your hands above your head to push the door open. If you have trouble with that motion, rooms 2 and 3 are more friendly: our Summer Sky tanks feature seven feet of vertical head room and a door set in the wall.
  • All users are required to shower with soap before their floats.
  • When floating, the solution covers the ears. We provide earplugs and strongly recommend their use.
  • The building is on the ground floor and wheelchair accessible.
  • The user is alone in their own tank, which is inside its own room for privacy. There is a shower in each individual room.

Some Specific Medical Considerations:

  • Uncontrolled epilepsy is a contraindication, as is any medication that compromises your ability to be alert and responsible alone in a bath.
  • If you have asthma or COPD, humidity might be a comfort issue.
  • If your kidney function is compromised, talk to your doctor about the magnesium soak before you come float.
  • Low blood pressure requires caution at the end of your float. Move slowly and use the safety grab bars.
  • Please do not float if you have an active infection and/or high fever.
  • If you’ve had a recent infection with a parasite, Giardia or Cryptosporidium, please do not float.
  • If you have issues with incontinence, please do not float.
  • If you appear to be intoxicated, you must pass a coherence test before being allowed to float. Water is not safe if you aren’t alert.
  • Adhesives don’t stand up well to the float solution. Tegaderm has come right off.
  • Ostomies, PICC lines, and PEG tubes require some discussion with your doctor, but they might be ok for floating depending on location and status. (See issues with broken skin and adhesives.) We have had people lay ostomy bags on their stomach and float with no problem.
  • For diabetics, there is some indication that magnesium (from epsom salt) can affect your blood glucose, but this is not well studied. It is also possible that soaking in epsom salt can dry your skin, increasing your risk of cracking.

We’re happy to answer any questions: please email us and let us know. We want to make your visit successful!

Construction progress 4

We are so close to being finished! The place is starting to look like something real. Our contractor is down to the last little details, and we’ve turned our attention from structural things like ceilings and walls, to putting together a whole lot of IKEA cabinets and furniture… and building the tanks themselves!

The Escape Pod tanks are built; an inspector came out to look at our setup and gave our guys a few notes and changes to make. They got right to work on that, and we’re one step closer to our general inspection. We’re waiting for our electrician to wire the pumps and then we’ll plug it all in. I made a gif of the building process… Continue reading Construction progress 4